Vision Screenings – No Substitute For A Complete Eye Exam

Vision Screenings – No Substitute For A Complete Eye Exam

Vision Screenings – No Substitute For A Complete Eye Exam

Vision screenings are limited eye tests that help identify people who are at risk for

vision screenings are not substitute for a comprehensive exam

Schedule a comprehensive eye exam today.

vision problems. These are the brief vision tests performed by the school nurse, a pediatrician, other health care providers or volunteers.

The eye test that you take when you get your driver’s license renewed is an example of a vision screening.

Depending on who is performing the test and where the test is given, vision screenings may include tests for blur, muscle coordination and/or common eye diseases.

Keep in mind that a vision screening can indicate that you need to get your eyes checked, but it does not serve as a substitute for a comprehensive eye exam.

A comprehensive eye examination is performed by an eye doctor and includes careful testing of all aspects of your vision. Based on the results of your exam, your eye doctor can recommend a treatment plan suited to your individual needs.

Remember, only an optometrist or ophthalmologist can provide a comprehensive eye exam — family physicians and pediatricians are not fully trained to do this, and studies have shown that they can miss important vision problems that require treatment.

That 80-90% of overall UV damage to our eyes is accumulated before the age of 18! Like skin damage from UV exposure, we now know occurred for the most part from exposure before the age of 18. Kids in UV protected sun glasses is highly recommended. Protect their eyes just like you do their delicate skin!

Water & contacts don’t mix. To help prevent eye infections, contact lenses should be removed before going swimming or in a hot tub. Alternatively, wear goggles.

The lenses in children’s eyes do not block as much UV radiation as they do in adults’ eyes, putting them at increased risk for sun damage to the eyes.

Left untreated, glaucoma can lead to vision loss. Glaucoma can strike without pain or other symptoms and is a leading cause of blindness in the United States. According to the American Optometric Association (AOA), early detection and treatment is critical to maintain healthy vision and protect the eyes from the effects of potentially blinding diseases, such as glaucoma.

Age-related macular degeneration is a leading cause of blindness. Learn the risk factors for this disease? Having a close family relative with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) puts you at higher risk for developing the disease yourself.