Latisse

Latisse

LATISSE

Tired of applying coat after coat of mascara to make your lashes look longer and more voluminous? Latisse, a prescription lash serum, might be the answer to your cosmetic prayers.

You have probably heard about Latisse, the eyelash grower that’s been on the market since the FDA approved it in December 2008. How do you use it? Is it safe for your eyes? And does it really work as an eyelash lengthener?

Latisse is actually a version of a glaucoma drug in eye drop form in use since 2001. Eye doctors and their glaucoma patients noticed the hair growth side effect, with longer, lusher eyelashes appearing over time.

According to studies, Latisse lengthens, thickens and darkens eyelashes via a process that isn’t fully understood. Like the hair on your head, eyelashes sprout, grow for a while and eventually fall out. Latisse both extends the growth phase and increases the number of hairs that sprout.

You apply Latisse by dabbing it on the upper lash line each night with the sterile applicators. The drug spreads to your lower lash line automatically as you blink. According to the manufacturer, you should never apply it in your eye or onto your lower lid. Before you apply, your face must be clean and your makeup and contact lenses removed.

After two months of nightly use, you may begin to see results. After three or four months, your doctor may recommend a treatment schedule of every two days. If you stop using Latisse, your eyelashes will gradually return to their former state.

LATISSE® is an FDA-approved treatment to grow eyelashes for people with inadequate or not enough lashes.

That 80-90% of overall UV damage to our eyes is accumulated before the age of 18! Like skin damage from UV exposure, we now know occurred for the most part from exposure before the age of 18. Kids in UV protected sun glasses is highly recommended. Protect their eyes just like you do their delicate skin!

Water & contacts don’t mix. To help prevent eye infections, contact lenses should be removed before going swimming or in a hot tub. Alternatively, wear goggles.

The lenses in children’s eyes do not block as much UV radiation as they do in adults’ eyes, putting them at increased risk for sun damage to the eyes.

Left untreated, glaucoma can lead to vision loss. Glaucoma can strike without pain or other symptoms and is a leading cause of blindness in the United States. According to the American Optometric Association (AOA), early detection and treatment is critical to maintain healthy vision and protect the eyes from the effects of potentially blinding diseases, such as glaucoma.

Age-related macular degeneration is a leading cause of blindness. Learn the risk factors for this disease? Having a close family relative with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) puts you at higher risk for developing the disease yourself.