What to Expect at Your Child’s First Exam

What to Expect at Your Child’s First Exam

What to Expect at Your Child’s First Exam

According to experts, 80% of learning is visual, which means that if your child is having difficulty seeing clearly, his or her learning can be affected. This also goes for infants who develop and learn about the world around them through their sense of sight.

As a parent, you may wonder whether your preschooler has a vision problem or when you should schedule your child’s first eye exam. Eye exams for children are extremely important, because 5 to 10 percent of preschoolers and 25 percent of school-aged children have vision problems.

At Silverdale Eye Physicians we provide a child-friendly environment during the exam and while in the waiting room. We understand that visiting any doctor’s office can be stressful for some children, so we work hard to make you and your child feel welcomed and as stress-free as possible.

If your child has been previously treated with glasses or contact lenses, bring them to the examination. Rest assured that we will communicate with your child’s primary care doctor, and will keep her or him advised of all treatments and recommend procedures.

 

That 80-90% of overall UV damage to our eyes is accumulated before the age of 18! Like skin damage from UV exposure, we now know occurred for the most part from exposure before the age of 18. Kids in UV protected sun glasses is highly recommended. Protect their eyes just like you do their delicate skin!

Water & contacts don’t mix. To help prevent eye infections, contact lenses should be removed before going swimming or in a hot tub. Alternatively, wear goggles.

The lenses in children’s eyes do not block as much UV radiation as they do in adults’ eyes, putting them at increased risk for sun damage to the eyes.

Left untreated, glaucoma can lead to vision loss. Glaucoma can strike without pain or other symptoms and is a leading cause of blindness in the United States. According to the American Optometric Association (AOA), early detection and treatment is critical to maintain healthy vision and protect the eyes from the effects of potentially blinding diseases, such as glaucoma.

Age-related macular degeneration is a leading cause of blindness. Learn the risk factors for this disease? Having a close family relative with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) puts you at higher risk for developing the disease yourself.